Serger Frederick, “Young boxer”

Frederick SERGER

Young boxer

74.5 x 60.5 cm

Presentation

Frederick B. Serger (real name: Frederik Bedrich Sinaberger, 1889 – 1965) was born to a Jewish family in the village near Brno Moravia, a province of Czechoslovakia. Showing artistic talent at a young age, he attended art schools in Brno, Vienna, and Munich. During World War I, Serger joined the Austrian Army and served in the Balkans. Later he traveled to Paris where he joined the Ecole de Paris (School of Paris) artists’ movement. During this period, he was influenced by the Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, and Expressionist movements.

In Paris he met and married Helen Spitzer. Serger and his young wife moved from Paris to Scoczow, a city on the Polish-Czech border. They remained in Scoczow for 12 years and he continued to work as an artist, exhibiting in museums in Poland. He also showed at the Paris Salon de Tuilleries and the Salon d’Automne. in Paris a high point in Serger’s career was an exhibition at the famed Bernheim-Jeune that was known for displaying the artwork of premier artists such as Pablo Picasso and Paul Cezanne. Finally, in 1937, the City of Paris Museum purchased one of his paintings to be part of their collection.

In 1941 Serger moved to New York, where he established a studio on 57th St. in Manhattan. He exhibited in New York Galleries such as, Lillenfelt Galleries, John Heller, Schoneman, a one-man show at De Young Museum in San Francisco and at the Museum of New Mexico in Santa Fe, at the Springfield Art Museum, and at the Butler Institute of American Art in Ohio; Serger participated in group shows at the Pennsylvania Academy of Art, Detroit Institute of Art, Philadelphia, Whitney Museum in New York and in countless other exhibits during the twenty-five years he lived and worked in New York.

Condition report:

The artwork is in excellent condition.

Provenance:

Important art collection, Zurich

Other Artworks

Did you like this? Share it!

diam Donec ut venenatis, mattis mattis leo vulputate, mi, dapibus id,